PRESENTATION OF ARAM PACHYAN'S NEW NOVEL P/F

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The presentation of Aram Pachyan’s new novel P/F took place on September 26th at “Mirzoyan” library.  The title was published by Edge Publishing house. During the event composer and pianist Arthur Avanesov, pianist and Founder of Are Performing Arts Festival Marine Karoyan and composer and vice-proctor of Yerevan State Conservatory Aram Hovhannisyan spoke about the book. The vent was moderated by journalist, writer and art manager Anush Khocharyan.

Aram Pachyan’s P/F is a fragmental novel. Old and new Yerevan, the river Getar, the vanished tram and the “lonely” man, who tries to find himself in the town of his memories, in his feelings and future dreams, they all meet in the novel. The author dedicates the novel to all his tutors of Zen Buddhism which also defines the philosophy of the novel. All the fragments of the novel are linked with each other, but their order does not matter at all and is just conditional. Having read the novel at one breath, you appear in need to reread it more slowly. P/F is a new novel and a new approach to finding answers to many questions.

Based on yet unpublished texts from P/F a musical vocal composition for violin and drums “Pachyan Fragments” was written by a composer Aram Hovhannisyan and was performed in Los Angeles’ “Zipper Hall” on 22nd of February, 2015.

In her essay dedicated to P/F Marine Karoyan, an artist and a musicologist, writes, “Pachyan fixes the fragments of gradually intensifying past, present and the future creeping out from behind the curtains, with Japanese techniques called Kintsugi. And this time the golden paste is Getar. Pachyan’s post play is a dedication to a river, in which he leaves his memories, love and songs. This is a song about trash, that any Rhine would have been jealous about. Like a cat liking his own wounds, the author, having equalized himself with the Getar, painlessly goes through his existential loneliness. But Aram doesn’t “ask for help” in this loneliness. He doesn’t need it. I don’t worry about him.”